On a quick political note: the reason I do not believe Bernie Sanders can win the Democratic nomination, no matter how many more states he wins, is that the vote is quite literally rigged. At the moment, Clinton has won 745 delegates to Sanders’ 540 – so she has a lead, but not an insurmountable one. However, if you add in the superdelegates pledged to her, her lead widens to 1221 to 541. 2382 delegates are needed to win, of a total of 4763, so I suppose he still could beat her, but it’s a steep uphill climb. I do not know if any of the pledged superdelegates could change their minds – I don’t know either whether that’s allowed to happen, or how often it does. This isn’t meant as an indictment of either candidate; I’d be fine with either as President. (Not looking forward to hearing the vitriol conservatives will spew if Hillary Clinton wins, but that’s not her fault.) But I do not like this two party system.

Onto more important topics, because politicians

After reading A Quartet in Autumn, I have concluded that Barbara Pym is not for me. I’ve always been under the impressions that she wouldn’t be, but D.E. Stevenson and Angela Thirkell, whom I like a lot, are always being compared to her (with the clear implication that Pym is the standard to whom others are compared). But it turns out that what I like in Stevenson and Thirkell (henceforth DES and AT to save typing) is precisely what I don’t like in Pym. They all write quiet, observant, very English (or Scottish) sorts of books, but DES and AT are quiet, wholesome and hopeful. They can see the world is changing, but the changes aren’t all bad by a long shot, and at least some of the characters in each book really like and understand each other. (There aren’t many books with an older couple as happily suited as Jock and Mamie in DES’s Music in the Hills and Shoulder the Sky – all the young people hope to be like them. Though when I say “older” – Jock is a year older than I am and Mamie nearly a decade younger. But anyway.) In DES’s stories, people either have roots, or set them down during the story. In AT’s, people either have roots or don’t much seem to need them because they’re moving and growing too fast to want any just yet. In contrast, Pym’s is the quiet of hopeless decay – everything is changing too fast, everyone has such shallow roots they’re likely to fall over at any time, no one understands each other well enough to be a true support – or would want to.

At least reading Pym was just sad. It wasn’t nearly as bad as the time I read one or two of E.F. Benson’s Mapp and Lucia books because she gets compared to Gaskell’s Cranton and to Jane Austen. Mapp and Lucia left a nasty taste in my mouth – a thing no one does in Cranton and that the nicer characters are generally trying to escape in Austen.

I’ve also juse been reading R.L. Naquin’s Unfinished Muse and Unamused Muse, a completely different kind of thing. They are light fantasy; they’ve got a similar basic idea to Riordan’s Percy Jackson books (that is, centered on modern children of the Greek gods) but handled in a completely different way. The heroine, who’s never kept a job long, ends up working at My. Olympus Employment Agency and hijinks ensue. They are fluff, but fun fluff, and they have a gratifying way of avoiding the gender sterotyping that fantasy aimed at women too often falls into. (I was scarred years ago by one book whose heroine fell into a fantasy world, became a goddess, and kept whining about how she needed some “girlfriends”.) This one has friends of both sexes, and she’s trying to get her own head straight before falling into a romance. I also appreciate that, while she is straight, it’s made clear that that isn’t a just of course only possible way to be. When a woman hits on her, she notices, doesn’t freak out, and just says “sorry, no thank you” politely. (Not a spoiler: that’s just a tiny occurrence, not a plot point.)

Tomorrow is my birthday and then we are off for a 3-day weekend. Yay!!