What I said on Facebook, about the guy who made 49 crosses and brought them to Orlando, to represent the people killed the last week:

“If someone put up a cross for me when I died, I’d come back and haunt them!”
I also noted that I do think the people wearing giant angel wings to shield mourners from picketers at the funerals are a more appropriate use of religious symbols – after all, you know in each case if they’re having the service at a place whose traditions include angels, like a church, synagogue or mosque.

What I said on Facebook to respond to all the people who chided me because *clearly* the guy who made he crosses had nothing but loving intentions:

“I understand that his intentions were good, and I’m certain that at least some (maybe most) of the victims would have appreciated the crosses. (I suspect all of them would have appreciated tolerance and outreach to the LGBT community while they were alive even more, but for all I know this guy already does that. Or maybe this was the event that first woke him to activism and he’ll be doing more in the future. ) I’m certainly not classing him as a hater. With all that said, though … You know how when you keep getting hot in one spot it gets sore, so that even a light tap or a friendly punch will hurt? For me and a lot of people in minority religions that kind of indifferent “hit”, where people just assume you’re Christian, happens day after day after day and creates a very sore spot. The Orlando episode so strongly highlights the need for us all to be not only sensitive to but even appreciative of each other’s differences, that the friendly “tap” of those crosses hits even harder than it might otherwise. So I’m not exactly condemning his actions, but I am saying ‘ouch!’ ”

What I won’t say on Facebook but is the nonetheless:

No, I don’t hate Christians. But do you know why I don’t? It’s because I work damn hard at not hating them, when so many seem to be going out of their way to make themselves either hateable (like the people who decry trans men and women in public bathrooms one week and are saying “we are Orlando” the next) or at least intensely annoying (like those in this case who think it’s just fine and dandy to assume everyone is Christian, or that those who aren’t naturally would be fine with having the label of a religion that’s not theirs being put on them when they can no longer speak for themselves – right after being killed for just being themselves, in another way. One of the ways I do this is to remind myself of the number of Christians I know who are not like that, who try to live by what Jesus did and said instead of using his name as an excuse for doing whatever the hell they want to do and hating anyone who does differently. We have a word, heteronormative, for those who try to describe the world as a place where it’s acceptable and respectful to assume everyone you might meet is straight. And the people who use that word are generally using it to make the point that it is NOT OK to make that assumption. For all I know, everyone killed at Pulse might well have identified as Christian – after all, it was Latin night and a high percentage of Latin@s do come from a Christian background(1). But not everyone sticks with the religion they’re born to, not everyone there was necessarily Latin@,, and most important, “a high percentage” is not synonymous with “all”. A lot of people are talking about tolerance and appreciation of diversity this week. It sure would be nice to see some of that in action.

(1) by “Christian background” I mean both Catholics and Protestants. I will not even get into the argument with people like the guy last week who told me the Pope is not a “real” Christian.